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Haiti ravaged by Hurricane Sandy

Smallholders were hit hard by the tropical storm

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  • Cyclone Sandy en Haïti  (2) ©SOS Enfants sans Frontières.JPG
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On October 25th and 26th, Hurricane Sandy violently swept through the Caribbean islands, leaving behind a wake of destruction. More than 50 deaths were reported, and nearly 18,000 people had to move into temporary shelters. Many houses were severely damaged.

Almost three years after the devastating January 12, 2010 earthquake that rocked Port-au-Prince and the surrounding rural areas in southeastern Haiti, Hurricane Sandy now adds itself to the list of frequently-occurring catastrophes in Haiti, one of the most vulnerable countries to natural disasters.

The agricultural destruction was catastrophic in several regions of the island, particularly in the south. Nearly 70% of banana, avocado, vetiver, yam, mango, and other fruit crops were destroyed, and many animals died of cold in the Haitian mountains. Carrot, cabbage, and bean crops were completely wiped out.

The passage of Hurricane Sandy has sparked worry about a major food crisis in Haiti over the next six months. Eleven percent of the country’s population already suffers directly from hunger and is barely able to secure enough food for just one meal per day.

AVSF currently carries out 17 projets in Haiti. Now more than ever, AVSF is working closely with Haitian families to help them get back on their feet after these catastrophes. You too can help them by soutenant nos actions

(Photos: SOS Enfants sans Frontières)